Randomized Control Trials

Show Take-Pause reduces stress and pain with 3 minutes of use

Volume29, Issue3

March 2022

Pages 270-277

Conclusion

Take-Pause, a VR-based mindfulness intervention, was more effective than passive distraction techniques at reducing short-term anxiety during ED visits for moderately painful conditions in teenagers.

Results

  • At 15 min post-intervention, the VR group had a reduction in mean anxiety score by 10 points and the iPad group by 6 points. (p < 0.001; 95% confidence interval = 0.44 to 7.6).
  • There were no clinically concerning adverse effects, such as headache, general discomfort, dizziness, and vision changes, in either group.

Methodology

  • 110 patients
  • 55 randomized equally to each group
  • No significant differences in baseline characteristics
  • Patients participated in the Take-Pause VR mindfulness exercise for 3 minutes. 


Volume134, Issue3

March 2024

Pages 1118-1126

Conclusion

The use of VR during HRM catheter insertion increased calmness compared to control. Change of skin conductance was also reduced in the VR group, suggesting decreased physiologic pain. 

Results

  • There was evidence of a significant positive effect of VR on calmness (p = 0.0095) STAI-6 rating, as well as on physiologic measures of pain with significantly decreased GSR rise time (p = 0.0137) and average rate of change of conductance change (p = 0.0035).

Methodology

  • 40 patients
  • 20 subjects in the intervention arm and 20 in the control arm.
  • Patients with dysphagia were prospectively recruited and randomized to undergo HRM with and without VR distraction.
  • Data collected included the State-Trait Anxiety Inventory-6 (STAI-6), the Short-Form McGill Pain Questionnaire, heart rate, and galvanic skin response (GSR) tracings.